MILLIONAIRE’S WILL IN LIMBO AFTER DEATH

The $4.2 million estate of a man and his mother is in limbo now that the man’s wife has been convicted of murdering the two. The convicted murderer went through a nine-week trial before being convicted, and now the family is battling over control of the will, which exemplifies how difficult probate law can be.

Now, the civil work begins with family members far and wide seeking their share as part of the complicated probate litigation process. Several of the relatives are being represented by one genealogist, who says that the legal issues surrounding the two estates are complex and challenging. So far, no clear heir has been determined.

The convicted murderer’s daughter has resumed her quest to prevent her mother from inheriting the money under Florida’s legal system. The woman’s conviction could nullify her claim to the multi-million dollar holdings. If the woman is disqualified, the money would go to her grandsons.

Furthermore, the relatives of the slain woman are expected to argue that relatives of a convicted killer should not stand to profit. The dead man’s half-brother has filed a motion requesting the revocation of the man’s will, saying that it had been unduly influenced by his wife.

Attorneys for the estate say that the victim was fully competent when he created his will. That legal team was court-appointed to distribute the pair’s assets. The man had created a will that would specifically provide for family members if the man’s wife and mother died before he did, according to those professionals.

If the convict can’t receive money from the estate, it will be as though she preceded her husband in death, at least in the eyes of the law.

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Written by Luis E. Barreto

Luis E. Barreto

Luis is a probate and guardianship litigator with over 23 years of experience in the field. Determination of heirs, will contests, breaches of fiduciary duty, removal of personal representatives, guardians and trustees are just some of the types of litigation he addresses. In addition, he administers non-contested estates and guardianships.